You have finished constructing and paving your parking lot, so what comes next? Whether it is for your office or residential apartment building, it is essential that it complies with the ADA regulationsAmerican Disability Act Regulations is not only about having elevators and ramps in your building, but the parking lot must also meet certain requirements to avoid government penalties and fines. Statistics from some of the most reliable sources show that about 50 million people in the United States of America live with a disability, with mobility limitations being the most common. The ADA regulations act, therefore, strives to ensure that there is no disability discrimination as far as paving and the parking lot is concerned. It also ensures everyone, including disabled people, have access to places that are open to the general public.

Perhaps you know this, but you may be wondering whether your parking lot has violated any of the ADA regulations. Well, in this article, we shall explain a few ADA violations that are often found in parking lots & which asphalt paving contractors follow. Take a look!

Having fewer than the minimum number of accessible parking spaces

There is no question about the fact that access to an office, residential apartment building, or any other building begins in the parking lot. The ADA Act states that the parking section must have a threshold number of accessible spaces. For instance, if the total spaces in a building are between one and twenty-five, then only one accessible parking space is required. If the total spaces are between 101 and 150, then the minimum accessible spaces are five, and so on and so forth. It is also required that at least 1 out of every 6 accessible parking spaces must be van accessible. Therefore, if your parking lot does not contain the number of accessible parking spaces, then you are committing an ADA violations.

ADA IS A CALIFORNIA REQUIREMENT FOR ALL BUSINESSES

Non-compliant ramps

Surfaces within your accessible parking spaces must be stable, firm, and slip-resistant. It should also include no significant changes in level. This is achievable by erecting accessible curbs and ramps. In most cases, an access aisle connects directly to a typical curb ramp that leads onto the entrance way or sidewalk of the building. The standard specification for ramps to comply with ADA is a slope of 1:12, 36 inches wide, and anti-slip edges. If your building, therefore, does not have ramps or the existing ramps do not adhere to standard specifications, then you are on the wrong side of the ADA rules.

Non-compliant handicapped accessible loading zones

Your parking lot must be handicapped accessible with standard loading zones. You can also contact us for ADA inspection. This zone must provide users a pull-up space of twenty feet minimum distance and ninety-six inches minimum width. It is also required that the loading zones should not overlap with the traffic way. Notably, accessible aisles, vehicle pull-up spaces, and the vehicular route from the passenger-loading zone should have a vertical clearance distance of 114 inches at the bare minimum. If your parking lot does not meet this specification, then you are violating one of the ADA regulations.

Non-compliant signage

You may be thinking that you are in compliance with the ADA because your parking lot already contains all of the things previously mentioned. Another important area of compliance is signage. For instance, your parking spaces should be identified with signs displaying the international handicapped accessibility symbol. The dimensions of this sign are 12 by 18 inches. The sign must be tall enough to be seen even if the parking space is occupied (at least 60 inches in height). If your parking lot does not meet the ADA parking requirements of these four areas, then, without doubt, you are not an ADA compliant. You should also be compliant with these ADA regulations while striping parking lot.

Original Source: https://www.ada-striping.com/